Features

Top 10 Films of 2019

10. Fighting with my Family

“It is far more gripping than its subject matter might suggest. Who ever would believe a story about a wrestling family from Norwich could have quite such heart and resonance”.

Check out The Independent’s review

9. Ordinary Love

“It’s that evocation of the intangible interface between the mundane and the monumental that lends Ordinary Love such universal appeal – the sense of down-to-earth characters quietly wrestling with the cosmic mysteries of life and death, love and grief, with a mixture of sorrow and laughter”. 

Check out The Guardian’s review.

8. Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Can You Ever Forgive Me? is a lively and compelling film with a sharp script and wonderful performances. It offers up no cheap sentiment or overblown emotion but is nonetheless affecting and quietly heartbreaking in its insightful and honest portrayal of loneliness, alienation and unlikely friendships”.

Check out Seensome’s review.

7. Beats

“Amplified by an electric soundtrack that doffs its baseball cap to the likes of techno and happy house, Beats is a taut yet transcendent time capsule of a movie. It’s a rhythmic celebration of our formative years, capturing the reckless essence of youth itself”.

Check out my review.

6. Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood

“The streak of melancholic nostalgia running through Once Upon a Time in Hollywood might have blunted the razor-sharp edge of Quentin Tarantino, but it only emphasises the care he puts into his craft”.

Check out my review.

5. Sons of Denmark

“The film’s big moments are amplified by a prominent but unobtrusive operatic score, and the stylish visuals really help to compliment a script which heightens the sense of frustration and unrest caused by government corruption”.

Check out my review.

4. Mid90s

“Hill writes and directs with a personal passion and his influences bleed through onto the screen and into the superb soundtrack”.

Check out my review.

3. The Souvenir

“A bleak, but richly textured tale of a toxic, tragic relationship between aspiring filmmaker Julie and her obnoxious boyfriend Anthony. The performances are stellar and nearly every frame is carefully composed like a desolate yet delicate painting”.

2. The Irishman

“Presenting the mobster life as a rich tapestry of violence, corruption, and lingering sorrow, The Irishman marks a reflective curtain call in the Scorsese saga of crime movies”.

Check out my review.

1. Marriage Story

“Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver are already held in high regard, and this is arguably the best they’ve ever been. Nicole and Charlie are presented as very real people, both having made mistakes, there’s no immediate side-taking in the couple’s complicated battle”.

Check out my review.

DVD

DVD review: Beats

Beats-Header

It’s the summer of 1994 in a West Lothian housing scheme, and Britain is on the cusp of the New Labour era. The scene is set for Beats, an indie drama directed by Brian Welsh. Based on Kieran Hurley’s award-winning play of the same name, the story follows best pals Johnno (Cristian Ortega) and Spanner (Lorn Macdonald) who share a love of acid house music. With the future of their friendship looking uncertain due to Johnno’s impending move out of town, they have a ‘fuck it’ moment and seek out an underground rave as a last hurrah.

Continue reading “DVD review: Beats”