cinema

Film review: The Black Phone

 After a brief foray into the MCU, writer and director Scott Derrickson returns to his horror roots for child-killer thriller The Black Phone. Set in Denver, Colorado in the late 1970s, the plot follows young teen Finney (Mason Thames) who dodges school bullies by day only to go back to a tricky home life with little sister Gwen (Madeleine McGraw) and their abusive, alcoholic father. When a string of kids go missing in the neighbourhood, rumour spreads of a crazed kidnapper known as ‘The Grabber’ (Ethan Hawke) and Finney soon finds himself bundled into the back of his van. 

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cinema

Film review: Good Luck to You, Leo Grande

Good Luck to You, Leo Grande is the third fictional feature and latest in a run of Sundance hits for Australian director Sophie Hyde. The dramedy plot centres around retired widow Nancy Stokes (Emma Thompson) who, after years of unsatisfying sex with her late husband, hires escort Leo (Daryl McCormack) for an adventurous night of passion at a local hotel. Their initial encounter is expectedly awkward, but the pair’s relationship soon develops into something far more intimate.

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DVD & Digital

DVD review: I Am Zlatan

 Winning trophies and causing controversy wherever he goes, Swedish superstar striker Zlatan Ibrahimović certainly knows how to make an impact. His illustrious story has now been given the cinematic treatment by director Jens Sjögren, with the leading role shared between actors Dominic Andersson Bajraktati and Granit Rushiti as he grows older. Based on the player’s autobiography, the biopic charts the early chapters in his life, from his challenging childhood in Malmö through to his turbulent spell at Ajax. 

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cinema

Film review: Between Two Worlds (Ouistreham)

Emmanuel Carrère is predominantly known as a non-fiction author but has always dabbled in cinema and television, directing his debut The Moustache in 2005 which was based upon his own novel. For his sophomore effort, he adapts autobiographical essay Le Quai de Ouistreham by journalist Florence Aubenas as drama Between Two Worlds.

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cinema

Film review: Everything Everywhere All at Once

The directorial duo known as the Daniels (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert) made their debut with ‘farting corpse movie’ Swiss Army Man in 2016, and have joined forces again for another surrealist comedy, this time with an ambitious sci-fi twist. Everything Everywhere All at Once is a multiverse action film that explores the intimate relationships between Chinese-American laundromat owner Evelyn (Michelle Yeoh), her husband Waymond (Ke Huy Quan), and Joy (Stephanie Hsu), their angsty teenage daughter. During a visit to a bleak, panel-lit IRS office to discuss their struggling family business with steely faced auditor Deirdre (Jamie Lee Curtis), they’re thrust into a mysterious alternate universe that splits their perception of reality, thus kickstarting an adventure where they must save the world from ultimate destruction.

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cinema

Film review: The Northman

Following on from the acclaim of his offbeat efforts The Witch and The Lighthouse, writer and director Robert Eggers returns on an epic scale with a big budget for his third feature The Northman. Based upon the same medieval Scandi legend that inspired Shakespeare to write Hamlet, this historical blockbuster tells the tale of Prince Amleth, played with an animalistic heft by a bulked-up Alexander Skarsgård. When King Aurvandill (Ethan Hawke) is brutally murdered by his brother (Claes Bang), who then proceeds to kidnap Queen Gudrún (Nicole Kidman), it sets up a Viking revenge saga as the protagonist vows to avenge his father, save his mother, and to kill his uncle Fjölnir.

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